Posts

help for addiction

No one wants to admit they need help for addiction to drugs or alcohol. Let’s look at the common reasons people hesitate to get the help they need.

Let’s face it. The prospect of leaving your home, job, and family for a month or more in order to get help for addiction is quite daunting. Indeed, just a fraction of those who would benefit from treatment never receives it, for one reason or another.

The list of reasons why someone would resist seeking help is long. There are always going to be perceived roadblocks to getting treatment, even if they are easily overcome with some effort.

The fact is, no matter what reasons someone may come up with to deny their need for treatment, getting such help is the ticket to survival. Learn how to overcome a loved one’s objections to rehab, and make a profound difference in their lives.

How Do You Know Someone Needs Help for Addiction or Dependence?

When someone you know is in the early phase of addiction it isn’t always something you would even notice. The symptoms are barely perceptible if even noticed at all. This is what makes addiction so hard to treat, in that the disease doesn’t really become visible until more advanced.

Still, even the early phase will provide clues that there is a substance problem. The person may be slipping up at work, acting secretive, having mood swings, or being irritable. Sure, these are not odd behaviors, but if they are out of the normal range for this person it could be a sign.

In the chronic stage of addiction, there are clear red flag warnings that the person is struggling with a substance problem. These might include:

  • Excessive absences at work or school.
  • Missing important appointments or meetings.
  • Visible signs, such as tremors, sweating, pinpoint pupils, bloating, sudden weight changes.
  • Avoids social events; isolates.
  • Has sudden onset of money problems.
  • Hides substances around the house or at work.
  • Is intoxicated at work.
  • Neglects appearance and hygiene.
  • Neglects obligations.
  • Loses interest in hobbies in favor of substance use.
  • Visible withdrawal symptoms.

If your loved one displays a cluster of these signs, gently approaching them about it is caring and prudent.

How to Approach a Loved One About their Substance Use

One of the most difficult things is to know the right way to approach someone with your concerns. When you decide to approach the loved one, it can feel like you are walking a tightrope. You want to strike the right balance of support, concern, and guidance—without a whiff of judgment.

Here are some tips for starting the conversation with your loved one:

  • Before you approach him or her, do some research. Know about the signs of addiction and treatment options so you can offer tangible guidance.
  • Wait for a private moment to approach them, versus bringing it up at a family gathering or work party. Pick a time when you can have a quiet, calm chat.
  • Resist judging them for their substance use at all costs.
  • Be compassionate in tone.
  • Suggest they start with getting a simple physical exam with their doctor. For some, this is less intimidating than going straight to rehab. Their lab work is likely to reveal the problem and the doctor can then advise them to go to rehab.
  • Offer to assist them in finding out their insurance benefits.
  • Offer to go with them to tour rehabs or to help them sift through rehab options.
  • Assure them that you will be there for emotional support throughout their treatment journey. If you are a family member, offer to participate in family activities at the rehab.

If you find that even when using these tips you cannot make headway, consider holding an intervention. Treatment programs offer intervention services.

Common Reasons People Don’t Seek Help for Addiction

So, what is it that keeps someone from getting the help they need for a substance use disorder?

These are the most common roadblocks to treatment:

  • Denial. No one wants to admit they might have a problem with a substance. There are reasons for this. They may not want to appear to be weak or lacking in control over their lives. Also, they might deny the problem so they have an excuse to keep using the substance.
  • Stigma. Even though there is much more open discussion about substance disorders these days, there is still a stigma attached to them. The person may worry about the affect rehab might have on their personal or professional reputation.
  • Cost. Treatment can be costly. Insurance plans, though, do tend to cover a portion of the rehab costs. Checking out the plan benefits is a good starting point. Beyond that, there may be some scholarships offered or a monthly payment plan.
  • Time. Someone with a demanding job may ignore their need for treatment simply because they can’t take a long leave of absence. When this is the case, an outpatient treatment program offers more flexibility and freedom.
  • Fear. There is a common fear of stopping the substance and gutting out the detox and withdrawal process. Most people with substance problems know full well how painful withdrawal symptoms can be. But there are drugs that are offered to help provide comfort and reduce much of the pain during detox.
  • Obligations. People may resist getting treatment because they worry about their parenting responsibilities or their pet’s needs. In most cases, a friend or family member can assist with this and cover for the person.

When you need help for addiction, but just don’t know which way to turn, reach out to a trusted friend. They can be your support and help guide you to the treatment you need to turn your life around.

Rehabs Malibu Luxury Addiction and Dual Diagnosis Treatment

Rehabs Malibu understands how hard it is to take that huge step and enter recovery. Our caring and dedicated staff is here to guide you through every step of the process. We are here to help you succeed and live your best life. Please give us a call today at (424) 425-3541.